Cities for someone cities for everyone

How cities can be designed for different varieties of people, and how the benefits accrue not only to that specific population, but to everyone.

Cities for someone cities for everyone
A video photocomposite capturing sensory experiences, by Stuart Neilsen, Cork, Ireland.

You’re reading this as part of the blog, but really, it’s only just a note to self I might add to, as well as something I can point others to, as I’ve already sent this list of links to a couple of people.

Basically, how cities can be designed for different varieties of people, and how the benefits accrue not only to that specific population, but to everyone.

§ A child friendly approach to urban design is vital. An Arup report, part of their Cities Alive project. “In our report Designing for urban childhoods, we explain how we can create healthier and more inclusive, resilient and competitive cities for all of us to live, work and grow up in. To showcase our thinking we compiled 40 global case studies, 14 recommended interventions and 15 actions for city leaders, developers and investors and built environment professionals.”

§ Designing for ageing communities. Another Arup report from the same project. “Identifies the specific needs of older people and proposes strategies and actions that cities can take to make communities more age-friendly. The report synthesises these strategies into a vision for the future, showing how communities around the word can achieve this vision and empower their older residents to live happy and fulfilling lives.”

§ The simplest tool for improving cities is also free. Guest essay by Sara Hendren for The New York Times, where she proposes time as a way to rethink cities, design new ways of seeing and living in neighbourhoods, along streets, in temporary parks, and even museums. Using time shifting, citizen groups and urban planners can find a very lightweight way of experimenting, of trying things out and letting the results speak for themselves. (First seen in issue No.183.)

§ When we design for autism, we design for everyone“Jaxson Stone sits down with Magda Mostafa, autism design consultant and architecture professor at the American University in Cairo, to discuss neuro-inclusive design and her installation at the Venice Architecture Biennale.”

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